People’s Choice Voting Now Open!

Cash Prize at Stake in Eleventh Annual National ‘Faces of Transportation’ Photo Contest

VOTE HERE!

Voters can choose their favorite photograph from among 78 images being judged in three categories: “Quality of Life/Community Development,” “Historic Projects,” and “Taking the Road Less Traveled.” Each photograph represents the positive effects of transportation on individuals and/or communities.

Mountain View Corridor Project Director Teri Newell looks on as crews work on the new 15-mile roadway. Newell has overseen this $1.035 billion project from the beginning.

Mountain View Corridor Project Director Teri Newell looks on as crews work on the new 15-mile roadway. Newell has overseen this $1.035 billion project from the beginning.

Voting starts today and runs through Sept. 8. The photograph receiving the highest number of online votes will receive the People’s Choice Award, and a $500 cash prize will be awarded to the photographer.

The People’s Choice Award winner and the recipient of this year’s Faces of Transportation Grand Prize Award will be announced on Sept. 29.

VOTE NOW!

Contest is Closed – But, Wait! There’s Much More!

Commissioner Greg Whirley is the face of the Virginia DOT, which is replacing the aging Huguenot Memorial Bridge over the James River in Richmond. Approximately 25,000 vehicles use the bridge daily. The first palce of the $51 million new bridge opened June 30, 2012.

Commissioner Greg Whirley is the face of the Virginia DOT, which is replacing the aging Huguenot Memorial Bridge over the James River in Richmond. Approximately 25,000 vehicles use the bridge daily. The first palce of the $51 million new bridge opened June 30, 2012.

It’s true: the deadline has passed for photo and video submittals to the Faces of Transportation contest. But, there’s so much more of the contest to come!

We received a large number of great entries, and we’re looking forward to putting them in front of our judge. The best part is, we will post them for YOU to vote on! You’ll get to select your favorite photos, and the top vote-getter will win the People’s Choice prize.

Check back here often for the opportunity to vote!

Orange is the New… Orange!

Jeff Fidanque, Drawbridge Operator, places a sign February 13, 2012, during a partial bridge closure for work on the Rio Vista Bridge. Thousands of maintenance workers throughout California are on our roads and bridges daily working to keep them safe and well maintained for the traveling public.

Jeff Fidanque, Drawbridge Operator, places a sign February 13, 2012, during a partial bridge closure for work on the Rio Vista Bridge. Thousands of maintenance workers throughout California are on our roads and bridges daily working to keep them safe and well maintained for the traveling public.

Let’s face it – when you’re taking photographs of transportation projects and people, there is often a LOT of the color orange around.

How do you compensate for that? How do you make the best of what you’re looking at? Andrew S. Gibson at the Digital Photography School recently posted an article that gives you some great tips on just that – and more. Check it out!

http://digital-photography-school.com/colour-contrast-making-the-most-of-orange-and-blue/

Taking Photos of People in Natural Light

Herbert Brown checks the air filter on a tractor during a vehicle inspection before going out to trim vegetation along the highways in Colleton County, South Carolina. Brown is the vegetation foreman for the South Carolina Department of Transportation’s Colleton Maintenance Office.

Herbert Brown checks the air filter on a tractor during a vehicle inspection before going out to trim vegetation along the highways in Colleton County, South Carolina. Brown is the vegetation foreman for the South Carolina Department of Transportation’s Colleton Maintenance Office.

Let’s face it: most of the transportation photos you’re going to take involve natural light – that is, you’re going to take a picture of someone outside, working, wearing bright colors, in variable conditions.

So, how do you prepare for that?

First, take a read of this post at an excellent photography blog, Phoblographer. (Probably not practical to take an reflective umbrella to an active construction site… but the other tips are worth taking note of.)

Second, be aware of the light and how it is going to affect your subject. Again, Phoblographer gives some tips on backlighting, and metering, which are essential.

Lastly, (and this almost goes without saying, but we’re going to say it anyway), keep your equipment in tip-top condition. It will pay you back a thousandfold with great pictures and an easy shoot.

So, get out there and take some great pictures of faces of transportation!